Trails & Tire Pressure 4 Maximum FUN

Other groups that rely on volunteer hours to groom ski trails throughout the city have been busy at work since the great snowfall we had this weekend. To ensure fatbikers maintain a good relationship with other user groups in the city, please do not ride your fatbike on groomed ski trails. The ruts caused by fatbike tires destroy the pack for skiing.

There are many trails that are shared use for fatbikers, snowshoers, dog walkers, etc throughout the city. Get out there and enjoy those trails and spread the word to other fatbikers to respect the ski trails. Click here to go to the trails section of our website: http://fatlanders.bike/rides/

Here is a photo that shows the difference that high and low tire pressure makes on a trail. The high pressure sinks deep, creating ruts and making for a heavy slog of a ride. The low air pressure allows the rider to float on top of the snow for a radically good ride!

This is a helpful formula for where to start playing with your tire pressure depending on your weight and the snow conditions:
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Packed Snow Fat Tire Formula
Body Weight in lb/20=Starting Pressure
Subtract 0.5 PSI for Fat Front Tire
Add 0.5 PSI for Fat Rear Tire

Example 150lb/20=7.5
7.5-0.5=7 PSI for Fat Front Tire
7.5+0.5=8 PSI for Fat Rear Tire
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Soft Snow Fat Tire Formula
Body Weight in lb/25=Starting Pressure
Subtract 0.5 PSI for Fat Front Tire
Add 0.5 PSI for Fat Rear

Example 150lb/25=6
6-0.5=5.5 PSI for Fat Front Tire
6+0.5=6.5 PSI for Fat Rear Tire
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Here are a few articles about how to adjust your tire pressure depending on snow conditions. This will ensure the mixed use trails we do use are in the best condition they can be for all users, and that you have the maximum FUN out there.

http://forums.mtbr.com/fat-bikes/fat-tire-pressures-snow-1000620.html

http://45nrth.com/blog/post/rules-of-fat-dialing-in-tire-pressure

Calculate the proper tire pressure if you store your bike indoors.
If you store your bike indoors between rides your indoor tire pressure will change once outside in the cold. To be sure you have the right tire pressure before leaving the warmth use this handy calculator: http://fatlanders.bike/pressure-calculator/

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